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Jimmer Fredette Unveils His Signature Shoe with 361 Degrees

361 degrees jimmer fredette signature 4

That’s right, the former BYU sharp-shooter and NBA player is getting his own signature.

Drafted as the 10th pick in the 2011 NBA draft, Fredette struggled to make an impact during his time in the league. Over the course of five years in the NBA, he bounced from team to team — Kings, Bulls, Pelicans, the D-League Westchester Knicks, and eventually the New York Knicks.

After only appearing in six games during the 2015-2016 season, he decided to shoot his shot overseas in China with the Shanghai Sharks. This turned out to be a better move for the 28-year-old as he averaged nearly 38 points per game last season and earned the International MVP award.

His stunning performance last season probably earned him his shoe deal with Chinese sportswear 361 Degrees. Today, photos of his sneaker, the 361 Jing Feng hit the Internets via Nick DePaula.

The knit upper features a digital-like pattern with branding on the lateral side, heel counter, and sockliner. The shoe takes a similar approach the Crazy Explosive 2017 does withe minimalist look and ankle collar. There is no word yet on whether the shoe features 361 Degrees’ responsive Qu!ckfoam.

Our very own Duke4005 loved Qu!ckfoam, you can check out his 361° Mazer performance review for more information.

What do you think of Fredette’s signature?

361 degrees jimmer fredette signature 1 361 degrees jimmer fredette signature 3

361 degrees jimmer fredette signature 2

361 degrees jimmer fredette signature 4

 

 

 

 

Images via NDP

19 comments
  1. They’re pretty nice looking, to be honest. Curious to know how they perform on the court, though.

    BTW – on the black & white sneaker, if anyone was curious, the Chinese characters at the top of the collar translates to, “361 degrees”. The numbers are written in the same way that numbers are written on cheques in China (to prevent fraud/someone changing the character to another number).

    Source: I studied Chinese for many years. I’m not fluent, but I can read simple things well enough. 🙂

    1. This came as a huge shocker for me as a guy from HK, only HK uses this to prevent fraud iirc, China doesn’t use this anymore with their simplified Chinese. Please correct me if I’m wrong but this really gives me an HK vibe, like them a lot.

      1. Here the correction comes. First of all, I think there are even different versions of traditional Chinese: HK and MCU use basically the same (more like a Cantonese version of traditional Chinese, tw uses another (more like the one mainland Chinese used to use), Singapore and Malaysia probably use the same as tw but now go simplified; secondly, mainland China still use this version when it comes to potential frauds, I know this because my mom is an account, “壹贰叁肆伍陆柒捌玖拾”(=12345678910) are not traditional Chinese, they are more like “capital numbers” or”numbers in charactors”.

        Just to sumerize:
        Simplified Chinese:
        一二三四五六七八九十 壹贰叁肆伍陆柒捌玖拾 叁陆壹度
        Traditional Chinese:
        一二三四五六七八九十 壹貳叄肆伍陸柒捌玖拾 叄陸壹度

        Sadly, the characters on the collar are a mixture of simplified and traditional Chinese. (how bored am I)

      2. I visited China last summer and they do use traditional Chinese on their money and some important signage, events etc. I saw a pretty big mix of people who used traditional for their storefronts and people who didn’t on the streets, it was interesting.

  2. Hm. I can’t edit my last post, but for anyone interested, the Chinese characters on the other sneakers (the orange, the red/blue, and blue) are 寂寞大神. That’s Jimmer Fredette’s name in Chinese (pronounced Jìmò dàshén, and translates roughly to the King/god of Loneliness…which isn’t as bad as it sounds since loneliness is a trait sometimes attributed to mental toughness/strength).

    1. Yeah that is a nickname he has been given because of the idea that the elite and the best are lonely because they are on a higher plane.

  3. Looks like a solid performer, the design looks a little like an updated CAM Highlight trainer, which were surprisingly good basketball trainers.

  4. Just on looks, these are actually pretty good. Reminds me of some gnarly 90s Nikes where they would put some alien plastic piece on the side. That 361 logo doesn’t flow well with the shoe, but on some cws it blends right into the woven material.

    Jimmer was a guy I’ve always thought, if he just got in the right situation, could’ve been a good shooter for a team, like JJ Redick, or a bench scorer like Lou Williams. It would be nice to see him in the league again, but I doubt that’ll happen.

    1. The choice would be role player off the bench scoring 10-13 points, wearing a team shoe if he’s lucky. Or super star sig shoe with massive fanbase.

    2. Yeah, Jimmer is an interesting case. There’s no real reason to come back to the US to play. When he was here, he was in the D League playing for the Westchester Knicks (I got to see him play). Then he got moved to the NYK, but didn’t get much in the way of minutes & opportunities. IIRC, he didn’t end up with any NBA team after that.

      So, sure, he could come back to the US, get put back in the D League and make no money…OR…he could stay in China and make a couple of million dollars per year and be treated like a star. Which you you choose? 😀

      1. True, he should probably stay in China and do his thing. Still, I can’t help but think if the Warriors or the Mike D’Antoni Rockets get him, he could get buckets off the bench in a hurry and prove to the NBA he ain’t no bust. It all comes down to the situation and getting an opportunity.

  5. Is Chinese an actual language? Thought there was Mandarin, Cantonese and other dialects. You don’t speak “Chinese”. Shoes are pretty sharp.

    1. That’s a fair point DY1323. That said, Mandarin is the official language, and other dialects are quickly dying off. For example, Shanghai used to have its own dialect, but today, most everyone speaks Mandarin. It’s kind of sad, actually.

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